Publications

November 15, 2013

Employment Choice And Mobility In Multisector Labor Markets

This paper examines employment choice and occupational
mobility using data from Ghana in a model that
incorporates capital market failure, credit constrained individuals and draw
self-employment capital from family asset.

Download Label
March 13, 2018 - 4:00 am
application/pdf
775.70 kB
v.1.7 (stable)
Read →

Author:Olumide Taiwo

Publication Date: November, 2012

Keywords: Employment Choice; Mobility; Multisectoral Labor Markets; Self Employment

JEL Classifications: J01, J21, J24, N37, O12, O17


This paper examines employment choice and occupational mobility using data from Ghana. In amodel that incorporates capital market failure, credit constrained individuals draw selfemploymentcapital from family asset. The empirical findings validate the predictions of thetheoretical model. The data shows very low rates of mobility across sectors and that workers infamily enterprise are the most mobile while self-employed workers are the least mobile. I findno robust evidence that wage earnings ease liquidity constraints. The findings suggest that bothliquidity and skill transferability constraints are important for mobility.




Related

 

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 33)

Available reports from the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation(NNPC), suggests a significant reduction in the cost incurred to produce one barrel of crude oil for the past two years. Specifically, the cost of production reduced by 71 percent from $78 as at August 2015, to $23 per barrel as at August 2017. This may be attributable to moderations in operational expenditures, following repairs and restructuring in the oil region.

Capital Importation And Budgetary Allocation (ITC)

Capital Importation: Given the positive outlook on the ITC sector in the past few years, investments in the sector reached a 10-year peak in 2014. However, the foreign investment fell marginally in 2

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 3)

Provisional Monetary statistics by the CBN show an increase in currency in circulation a portion of overall money supply. Specifically, currency in circulation rose (Month-on-Month) by 14.2 percent to N2.2 million in December 2016  the highest Month-on-Month increase recorded for the year 2016. The rise in currency- outside-bank may be attributed to the growing demand for cash balances for spending activities during the festive period. This development would largely compound the liquidity problem associated with TSA implementation and ongoing CBN monetary tightening as deposit money banks might be cash-strapped. Going forward, efforts should be geared towards intensifying initiatives that promote a cashless economy that encourages cashless transactions.