Annual Report

August 31, 2017

CSEA ANNUAL REPORT

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CSEA has continued in its tradition of providing rigorous and relevant evidence-based research that is used to inform policies in Nigeria. To provide timely and relevant evidence-based research on Nigeria‟s economy, the Centre established the Information and Data Management Unit (IDM). The main objective of this Unit is to collate qualitative and quantitative data and provide periodic analysis on Nigeria‟s economy. The unit consists of a Research Associate, Research Assistants and Communications officer. The team produces a weekly update of recent happenings in the economy under CSEA‟s thematic research areas.




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Extra-ECOWAS Trade And Investment Flows: Any Evidence Of Business Cycles Transmission

This study investigates the effects of merchandise trade and investment flows on the transmission of business cycles between members of ECOWAS and the major trading partnersbetween 1985 and 2014. Total trade and FDI significantly influence the transmission of business cycles with elasticities of 1.1% and 0.7%, respectively in the long run. There are little variations across the major trading partners and other measures of trade flows. Intra-industry trade flows with all partners, EU and USA influences the cross-country business cycles with elasticities of 1.0%, 0.5% and 1.8%, respectively. 

Transparency Deficits In The Disclosure Of Oil Sector Information In Nigeria

This brief examines the challenges in the discharge of statutory transparency roles by strategic regulatory institutions in the oil sector and also identifies policy interventions to improve access to information on key oil sector processes and transactions.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 51)

Recently released data by the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) shows that there was significant increase in Nigerias total merchandise trade for 2016Q3. Basically, the total merchandise trade increased (quarter-on-quarter) by 16.29 percent to N4, 722 billion in 2016Q3;owing to 29.1 percent increase in exports and 6.2 percent rise in imports. Oil exports increased by 31 percent to N1, 943 billion, while non-oil exports increased by 20.5 percent to N440 billion. However, on the aggregate, Nigeria recorded yet another trade deficit of N104 billion, indicating continuous higher imports relative to exports. Overall, though there is improvement in the performance of non-oil sector, however, this is insufficient to effectively complement the loss in oil trade sustained since the beginning of oil price crash. This suggests that diversification into non-oil sector may not be able to rescue the economy in the short term. However, while the diversification efforts should be sustained, eliminating hurdles in oil production may be instrumental to higher exports, especially as oil price increase is gaining momentum.