Annual Report

August 31, 2017

CSEA ANNUAL REPORT

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CSEA has continued in its tradition of providing rigorous and relevant evidence-based research that is used to inform policies in Nigeria. To provide timely and relevant evidence-based research on Nigeria‟s economy, the Centre established the Information and Data Management Unit (IDM). The main objective of this Unit is to collate qualitative and quantitative data and provide periodic analysis on Nigeria‟s economy. The unit consists of a Research Associate, Research Assistants and Communications officer. The team produces a weekly update of recent happenings in the economy under CSEA‟s thematic research areas.




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Benefit Incidence Analysis Of Education And Health Spending In Nigeria

This brief examines the beneficiaries of government expenditure in the social sectors of education and health, and answers the question of equity in the provision of social services among different income groups.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 17)

Activities in the manufacturing sector remained at levels recorded in 2016Q3. Specifically, manufacturing capacity utilization (a measure of potential manufacturing output that is actually realized) remained at 48.46 percent in 2016Q4 below average. During the quarter, structural bottlenecks such as epileptic power supply (average of 2, 548 Megawatts) in addition to forex constraints, hampered manufacturing activities. As such, high cost of raw materials and cost of production subdued activities in the short term. Recent efforts by the monetary authority to increase forex access to the manufacturing sector as well as improvement in gas supply and electricity generation would help minimize production costs and enhance production process.

Africa Economic Update (Issue 1)

Sub-Saharan Africa experienced its worst economic performance in over two decades in 2016, with growth slowing to 1.5 percent. The poor performance in South Africa and oil exporting countries is responsible for attenuating regional growth rate, due to their high collective contribution to regional GDP, despite robust performance in non-resource intensive countries. Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa is projected to slightly improve in 2017 (2.9 percent) and further strengthen in 2018 (3.6 percent). At the sub-regional level, growth prospect is estimated to be highest in West Africa (4.78 percent), attributable to 5.93 percent growth rate from West African Monetary Union (WAEMU) Countries. East Africa is expected to grow at 4.5 percent, Southern Africa 3 percent, and Central Africa 2 percent. Agricultural exporting countries are projected to grow at around 7 percent, while oil producing countries are estimated to grow at 1.9 percent, which indicates a recovery from the negative growth recorded in 2016.