Publications

July 7, 2017

Consequences Of School Resources For Educational Achievement

This paper examines the
determinants of educational achievement in a developing country context,
Burkina Faso. We deviate from the extant literature by constructing an
aggregate index of school quality from the observable school resources. Also, we
account for school choice constraints, faced by children especially in rural
areas, as it relates to the geographical inequalities in the distribution of
quality schools. These treatments provide an unbiased estimates of the
relevance of school resources for academic performance. The empirical approach
is based on a two-stage procedure that accounts for supply constraints in
school choice.

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