Policy Brief & Alerts

August 22, 2017

An Analysis Of The Nigerian Economic Growth And Recovery Plan

This Paper examines the response of the Nigerian government to the ongoing recession in
the domestic economy, particularly in the context of the recently released Economic
Recovery and Growth Plan (ERGP) for 2017-2020. It also provides an analysis of
key questions regarding the suitability, achievability, and prospect of the
ERGP. The second section of the brief runs through the state of the Nigerian
economy with a focus on the cause and drivers of the ongoing recession. The
third section reviews the objectives, implementation strategy, and expected
outcomes of the ERGP over the medium-term. The fourth section weighs on the
potentials of the ERGP by analyzing some pertinent questions: Is the proposed
recovery plan and policies well-targeted to address prevailing economic crises
in Nigerian economy? 

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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 23)

Recent Data on Nigerias Real GDP growth rate (Year-on-Year) declined by 2.47 percentage points, from 2.11 per cent in 2015Q4 to -0.36 percent in 2016Q11. This is the lowest GDP growth rate since 2004Q2 (-0.81 percent). The Oil sector continued to contract, as -1.89 percent growth was recorded in 2016Q1. The negative growth witnessed in the oil sector was likely driven by the fall in global oil prices by $9.732 and decline in domestic crude oil production, relative to preceding quarter. Similarly, the Non-oil sector witnessed a negative growth as it declined by 3.32 percentage points from 3.14 percent in 2015 Q4 to -0.18 percent in 2016Q1. The underperformance in the non-oil sector was driven by significant contractions in financial (by 17.69 percent), manufacturing (by 8.77 percent), and real estate (by 5.48 percent) sub-sectors. Given that the present economic fundamentals point to a likely recession in 2016Q2, the government can stir economic activities by speeding up the budget implementation process to spur growth in the non-oil sector and the economy at large. More so, the domestic production shock in the oil sector needs to be addressed to effectively leverage on the present marginal rise in crude oil prices.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 18)

Inflation rate continued its upward trajectory in the week under review. Specifically, the Consumer Price Index (CPI) increased by 1.39 per cent, from 11.38 per cent in February to 12.77 per cent in March, 20161. Remarkably, this is the highest rate since July 2012, representing a 4-year high. While both components of the CPI rose in the period, the food sub-index was largely the main driver of the increase in the CPI, with a growth rate of 1.39 per cent between February and March. The persistent scarcity in petroleum products, especially Premium Motor Spirit (PMS), has increased transportation costs and the price of food items.